Willie Joe Duncan “The Unitar Man”

Willie Joe Duncan is one of the darkest guitarists of the 50’s, and everything he has in darkness he has in fierceness and rawness.

Joe Willie Duncan was a Detroit blues musician who played a single-stringed instrument he called the Unitar, this instrument was electrified and was a variation of The Diddley Bow, customized by Willie Joe. This curious instrument consisted of a wooden plank over 2 meters high, on which he had strung a wire string that was connected to a DeArmond acoustic guitar pickup. The instrument was played with a bottle as a slide, but Duncan used a piece of leather to be able to hit the string and create a strange sound close to the Slap.

In the late 1940s, Duncan and his strange guitar, became associated with the legendary blues musician Jimmy Reed, author of such hits as “Big Boos Man”, “Bright Lights Big City”, “Shame, Shane, Shame” or “Baby Whant you Want Me To Do”. Jerry and Willie Joe would perform in any store, joint or street corner in Detroit where they were allowed to play.

The couple became very popular in Detroit, mostly thanks to Duncan’s instrument, which attracted a lot of attention. If there was a place to plug in their instruments, they already had a stage. Reed played the guitar and sang. Willie Joe played his Unitar and sometimes also sang, in addition to playing the spoons, as percussion in some songs.

For a while Reed and Willie Joe became very popular in Detroit, but Willie Joe decided to move to California, where he thought he would have many more opportunities than in the Detroit ghettos. But before he left Detroit, Reed gave him a portable Unitar for the trip, with a hinge on the instrument, making it foldable! Willie Joe settled in Palo Alto and continued his street shows. He became very popular in the city because he was the only black man who dressed like a cowboy, and rode around town on his Unitar.

In 1956 Rene Hall, the leader of the band that accompanied the Specialty Records artists, discovered Willie Joe Duncan by chance. In 1956 Speciality was at its best, they had Little Richard, Lloyd Price, Guitar Slim or Etta James on their payroll, among other giants of Rock & Roll and R’n’B. In Specialty they thought that Willie Joe and his Unitar would be ideal to accompany Bob Landers, a singer who had a song called “Cherokee Dance”. Landers had a somewhat peculiar voice, reportedly because he had suffered from throat cancer that had left his vocal cords a bit spoiled, this distinctive voice had earned him the nickname “The Frog”. Landers died shortly after the song’s release.

The B-side of this single hides an original Willie Joe instrumental “Unitar Rock,” a one-liner that Duncan makes his instrument howl in a hellish way. In this track, it’s Specialty’s band that accompanies Willie Joe. I think this issue opened the way for, in a few years, songs like “Rumble” by Link Wray, could succeed.

In 1957 Willie Joe was required again by Specialty, as a studio musician, playing in the single of the label the instrumental “Twitchy” by Rene Hall. In 1958, Hall left Specialty and signed to Rendezvous Records in Los Angeles. Hall enlisted the services of Willie Joe and his Unitar to record Ernie Field’s “Teen Flip” in 1960.

During the rest of the 50’s and 60’s, Willie Joe Duncan appeared regularly on local TV shows alongside figures such as Johnny Otis and Hunter Hancock, alternating these performances with concerts in local bars.

It wasn’t until 1985, when Little Willie G, who had a radio show in Los Angeles, rediscovered him to the world, asking him to perform on his radio show, that Willie Joe gladly accepted and offered a magnificent show, playing some of the songs he had recorded on Specialty, such as “Unitar Rock”. Unfortunately, Willie Joe died 3 years later, but still Willie Joe’s legacy has reached a small section of musicians of our days, perhaps the best known of these musicians was the late Grunge musician Mark Sandman, who had a two-string bass built that copied the sound of Willie Joe’s Unitar.

There are 3 or 4 songs from 1988 recorded in Palo Alto, which run through YouTube in which we can hear Willie Joe Duncan, in top form, playing his own songs and some version of Jimmy Reed and Muddy Waters, in these songs he’s accompanied by Chester D. Wilson and Willie G spoons.

Juanmy “The Hunter”

Bert Weedon (The British Les Paul)

Whenever I think of Bert Weedon I can’t help but seeing him as a kind of British Les Paul, maybe because they are both over 35 in the 50’s, or because they both started playing on Big Bands in the late 30’s, or because they both influenced to later generation Rock & Roll guitarists from their respective countries. Their influences were similar, but Les Paul was 5 years older than Weedon and his recordings influenced the British, and not the opposite. Although Weedon was influenced by Les Paul’s technique and music, his playing continued to evolve, and when the first Rock & Roll songs appeared in Great Britain, Weedon had no problem experimenting with these new sounds.

Most likely without Bert Weedon, Rock & Roll in England would be very different from how we know it. Although Weedon was in his 30s in the 50s, he had no qualms about putting his guitar at the service of Billy Fury, Tommy Steel, Johnny Kidd or Adam Faith, among many others, as a session musician in some of his most famous songs.

Weedon combined his work as a guitarist in the BBC Show Band with that of a session or accompaniment musician, during the 50’s and early 60’s Weedon accompanied American stars of the likes of Frank Sinatra, Judy Garland and Nat King Cole.

His 1959 song “Guitar Boogie Shuffle” made him the first guitarist to enter the UK Singles list, specifically peaking at number 5, something most unusual, being an instrumental song. Weedon was already a well-known musician before entering the charts, in 1957 he had published the tutorial book “Play in a Day” of which he sold a million copies, a whole generation of young rockers learned to play the guitar or improved His technique with the book by Weedon, Paul McCartney, Hank Marvin, George Harrison, John Lennon, Pete Townshed, Keith Richards, Jimmy Page, Eric Clapton, Mark Knofler, Mike Oldfield and a long list of other musicians have cited him as a key in his learning years. Paul McCartney once commented, “George and I learned to play together with Bert Weedon’s books.” Eric Clapton said, “I would not have felt the need to move on had it not been for the advice and encouragement Bert’s book gave me. I have never met a guitarist of my generation who does not say the same thing.” Brian May also commented on Weedon: “There is no guitarist of my generation in the UK who does not have a huge debt of gratitude to him.”

But of all these students, I think the one who applied his teachings the best and most faithful has been Weedon’s style is Hank Marvin with The Shadows. As everyone knows, the first big hit of The Shadows was the Apache theme, well, this song was recorded by Weedon in 1960, but Jerry Lordan, the songwriter of the theme, didn’t like Weedon’s version and ran to offering it to The Shadows who recorded it a month after Weedon, so teacher and students competed on the hit charts with the same song, with The Shadows being the winners as they placed the track at the top of the chart for 5 weeks, while Weedon only reached number 24.

Bert Weedon continued to enjoy great popularity during the 1960s, there are more than 5,000 performances on the BBC throughout his career, he also appeared on children’s television spots. In 1970 his Lp Rockin ‘At The Roundhouse ”appeared, a perfect album, where Weedon reviews some Rock & Roll classics such as“ Shakin’ All Over ”,“ Walk Don’t Run ”,“ Heartbreak Hotel ”and also songs from his usual repertoire, “Bert Boogie” and “Apache” plus the album includes some new track like the masterful instrumental that gives the album its title, the result is magnificent, and competes in quality with any of his recordings from the early 60’s.

In 1976, Weedon peaked at number 1 on the English album chart with the LP “22 Golden Guitar Greats,” a compilation album released by Warwick Records. Weedon passed away on April 20, 2012, leaving a great legacy of great instrumentals, essential to understand the sound of Rock & Roll that was born in England in the 1950s and early 1960s.

Juanmy “The Hunter”

Bert Weedon (el Les Paul británico)

Siempre que pienso en Bert Weedon no puedo evitar verlo como una especie de Les Paul británico, quizá porque ambos son mayores de 35 años en los 50’s, o porque ambos empiezan tocando en Big Bands a finales de los años 30’s, o porque los dos influenciaron a los guitarristas de Rock & Roll de generaciones posteriores de sus respectivos países. Sus influencias fueron similares, pero Les Paul era 5 años mayor que Weedon y sus grabaciones influyeron en el británico, y no al contrario. Aunque Weedon se influenció de la técnica y música de Les Paul su manera de tocar siguió evolucionando, y cuando aparecieron los primeros temas de Rock & Roll en Gran Bretaña Weedon no tuvo ningún problema en experimentar dentro de esos nuevos sonidos.

Muy probablemente sin Bert Weedon, el Rock & Roll en Inglaterra sería muy distinto a como lo conocemos. Aunque en la década de los 50’s Weedon ya pasaba de los 30 años no tuvo ningún reparo en poner su guitarra al servicio de Billy Fury, Tommy Steel, Johnny Kidd o Adam Faith, entre otros muchos, como músico de sesión en algunos de sus temas más célebres.

Weedon compaginaba su trabajo como guitarrista en la BBC Show Band, con el de músico de sesión o acompañamiento, durante los 50’s y primeros 60’s Weedon acompañó a estrellas americanas de la talla de Frank Sinatra, Judy Garland y Nat King Cole.

Su tema de 1959 “Guitar Boogie Shuffle”, le convirtió en el primer guitarrista que entraba en la lista de UK Singles, concretamente alcanzó el puesto número 5, algo de lo más inusual, tratándose de una canción instrumental. Weedon ya era un músico bien conocido antes de entrar en las listas de éxito, en 1957 había publicado el libro tutorial “Play in a Day” del que vendió un millón de copias, toda una generación de jóvenes roqueros aprendieron a tocar la guitarra o mejoraron su técnica con el libro de Weedon, Paul McCartney, Hank Marvin, George Harrison, John Lennon, Pete Townshed, Keith Richards, Jimmy Page, Eric Clapton, Mark Knofler, Mike Oldfield y una larguísima lista de músicos más le han citado como clave en sus años de aprendizaje. Paul McCartney comentó en una ocasión: “George y yo aprendimos juntos a tocar con los libros de Bert Weedon.” Eric Clapton dijo, “No habría sentido la necesidad de seguir adelante si no hubiera sido por los consejos y el estímulo que el libro de Bert me brindó. Nunca he conocido a un guitarrista de mi generación que no diga lo mismo”. Brian May también comentó sobre Weedon: “No hay guitarrista de mi generación en el Reino Unido que no tenga una enorme deuda de gratitud hacia él.”

Pero de todos estos alumnos creo que el que mejor aplicó sus enseñanzas y más fiel ha sido al estilo de Weedon es Hank Marvin con The Shadows. Como todo el mundo sabe, el primer gran éxito de The Shadows fue el tema Apache, pues bien, esta canción fue grabada por Weedon en 1960, pero a Jerry Lordan, el compositor del tema, no le gustó la versión de Weedon y corrió a ofrecérsela a The Shadows que la grabaron un mes después de Weedon, así que maestro y alumnos compitieron en las listas de éxito con la misma canción, siendo The Shadows los vencedores, ya que colocaron el tema en lo alto de la lista durante 5 semanas, mientras que Weedon solo alcanzó el puesto número 24.

Bert Weedon siguió gozando de gran popularidad durante la década de los 60’s, se cuentan más de 5000 actuaciones en la BBC durante toda su carrera, también apareció en espacios infantiles de televisión. En 1970 apareció su Lp Rockin’ At The Roundhouse”, un disco perfecto, donde Weedon, repasa algunos clásicos del Rock & Roll como “Shakin’ All Over”, “Walk Don’t Run”, “Heartbreak Hotel” y también temas de su repertorio de siempre, “Bert Boogie” y “Apache” además el disco incluye algún tema nuevo como el magistral instrumental que da título al álbum, el resultado es magnífico, y compite en calidad con cualquiera de sus grabaciones de los primeros 60’s.

En 1976, Weedon llegó al número 1 de la lista inglesa de álbumes con el Lp “22 Golden Guitar Greats”, álbum recopilatorio publicado por Warwick Records. Weedon falleció el 20 de abril de 2012, dejando un gran legado de grandes instrumentales, fundamentales para entender el sonido del Rock & Roll que se gestó en Inglaterra en la década de los 50’s y primeros 60’s.

Juanmy “The Hunter”

From instrumental song to Vocal Nº1

“Time Is on My Side” is one of those songs that are part of the top of Poision Ivy Lovers, written by Jerry Ragovoy, under the pseudonym “Norman Meade”. It was first recorded by jazz trombonist Kai Winding in 1963. Winding was a renowned Jazzy Pop musician Dionne Warwick, Dee Dee Warwick, and Cissy Houston recognized by the Jazz and pop trombonist who had passed by Benny Goodman’s bands. and Stan Kenton. In 1963 Winding had achieved notable success with the instrumental track “More”, included in the Lp “!!! More !!! ” (Theme From Mondo Cane) ”for the Verve Records label, an album that I take the opportunity to recommend from here, Easy Listen, Surf, Pop Exotica come together in a wonderful album, where the“ Pipeline ”of The Chantays,“ Comin ‘, coexist Home Baby ”by Mel Torme, or the wonderful“ More ”, by Riz Ortolani and Nino Oliviero, the latter with a treatment in Surf key reminiscent of“ Telstar ”by The Tornadoes, for something on the back cover of this LP the subtitle appears “Soul Surfin'”. Briefly commenting on this album is essential to understand why musical parameters Kai Winding was moving at that time, despite being 41 years old in 1963, Winding absorbed musical styles such as Surf, which were purely youthful.

“Time Is on My Side” was recorded in October 1963 for the Verve label, the song was conceived as an instrumental theme, which had a chorus, in the beginning some background vocals were thought, repeating the song title. In the end, the choir was more present than initially thought, and thankfully it was so, since the voices were no more and no less than Cissy Houston, Dionne Warwick and Dee Dee Warwick.

The song has been covered countless times, Irma Thomas, The Rolling Stones, Wilson Pickett, Paul Revere & The Raiders, Moody Blues, Brian Poole & The Tremeloes, The O’jays, The Pretty Things, Blondie, Patty Smith, Tracy Nelson, Kim Wilson and many others have recorded or versioned it live. The most notable of these versions are, without a doubt, that of Irma Thomas and that of The Rollings Stones.

The Irma Thomas version was recorded in 1964 for Imperial Records, and it was the first to have full lyrics, Jimmy Norman was in charge of creating the lyrics. He appeared as side B of the song “Anyone Who Knows What Love Is (Will Understand)”. The version of Irma Thomas was the one that The Rolling Stones covered, and with their interpretation they managed to reach the top of the charts, they were number 1 in UK and USA number 6. It was the first song by The Rolling Stones to enter the American Top Ten.

The Rolling Stones recorded it twice, in 1964 they included it in their album “12×5”, and in 1965 in their album “The Rolling Stones 2”, the two have different intros.

I think that in addition to citing these two versions as the most outstanding, we must also mention the versions made by Wilson Pickett, Paul Revere & The Raiders and Kim Wilson (The Fabulous Thunderbirds).

The song has been used in several series and television spots, and as the movie soundtrack, the most popular without a doubt, is the horror film “Fallen” from 1998, starring Denzel Washington.

Juanmy “The Hunter”

Time is on my side, yes it is
Time is on my side, yes it is
Now you always say
That you want to be free
But you’ll come running back (said you would baby)
You’ll come running back (I said so many times before)
You’ll come running back to me
Oh, time is on my side, yes it is
Time is on my side, yes it is
You’re searching for good times
But just wait and see
You’ll come running back (I won’t have to worry no more)
You’ll come running back (spend the rest of my life with you, baby)
You’ll come running back to me
Go ahead, go ahead and light up the town
And baby, do everything your heart desires
Remember, I’ll always be around
And I know, I know
Like I told you so many times before
You’re gonna come back, baby
‘Cause I know
You’re gonna come back knocking
Yeah, knocking right on my door
Yes, yes!
Well, time is on my side, yes it is
Time is on my side, yes it is
‘Cause I got the real love
The kind that you need
You’ll come running back (said you would, baby)
You’ll come running back (I always said you would)
You’ll come running back, to me
Yes time, time, time is on my side, yes it is
Time, time, time is on my side, yes it is
Oh, time, time, time is on my side, yes it is
I said, time, time, time is on my side, yes it is
Oh, time, time, time is on my side
Yeah, time, time, time is on my side

De Instrumental a nº1 Vocal

“Time Is on My Side” es una de esas canciones que forman parte del top de Poision Ivy Lovers, escrita por Jerry Ragovoy, bajo el seudónimo “Norman Meade”. Fue grabada por primera vez por el trombonista de jazz Kai Winding en 1963. Winding era un reputado músico de Jazzy Pop Dionne Warwick, Dee Dee Warwick y Cissy Houston reconocida por el trombonista de Jazz y pop que había pasado por de las bandas de Benny Goodman y Stan Kenton. En 1963, Winding, había conseguido un éxito notable con el tema instrumental “More”, incluido en el Lp “!!! More !!!” (Theme From Mondo Cane)” para el sello Verve Records, disco que aprovecho para recomendar desde aquí, Easy Listen, Surf, Pop Exotica se dan la mano en un disco maravilloso, donde cohabitan el “Pipeline” de The Chantays, “Comin’ Home Baby” de Mel Torme, o la maravillosa “More”, de Riz Ortolani y Nino Oliviero, esta última con un tratamiento en clave Surf que recuerda a “Telstar” de The Tornadoes, por algo en la contraportada de este LP aparece el subtítulo “Soul Surfin’”. El comentar brevemente este disco es fundamental para entender por qué parámetros musicales se movía Kai Winding en esos momentos, pese a tener 41 años en 1963, Winding absorbía estilos musicales como el Surf, que eran puramente juveniles.
“Time Is on My Side” fue grabada en Octubre de 1963 para el sello Verve, la canción fue concebida como un tema instrumental, que contaba con un coro, en principio se pensó en unas voces de fondo, que repetían el título de la canción. Al final el coro quedó más presente de lo que se pensó en un principio, y menos mal que fue así, ya que las encargadas de las voces fueron nada más y nada menos que Cissy Houston, Dionne Warwick y Dee Dee Warwick.
La canción ha sido versionada infinidad de veces, Irma Thomas, The Rolling Stones, Wilson Pickett, Paul Revere & The Raiders, Moody Blues, Brian Poole & The Tremeloes, The O’jays, The Pretty Things, Blondie, Patty Smith, Tracy Nelson, Kim Wilson y muchos más la han grabado o versionado en directo. Las más destacables de estas versiones son, sin duda, la de Irma Thomas y la de The Rollings Stones.
La versión de Irma Thomas se grabó en 1964 para Imperial Records, y fue la primera que tuvo letra completa, Jimmy Norman fue el encargado de crear la letra. Apareció como cara B del tema “Anyone Who Knows What Love Is (Will Understand)”. La versión de Irma Thomas fue la que The Rolling Stones versionaron, y con su interpretación consiguieron llegar a todo lo alto de las listas, fueron número 1 en UK y número 6 en USA. Fue la primera canción de The Rolling Stones en entrar en el Top Ten estadounidense.
The Rolling Stones la grabaron dos veces, en 1964 la incluyeron en su álbum “12×5”, y en 1965 en su disco “The Rolling Stones 2”, las dos cuentan con intros diferentes.
Creo que además de citar estas dos versiones como las más destacadas, hay que mencionar también las versiones que hicieron Wilson Pickett, Paul Revere & The Raiders y Kim Wilson (The Fabulous Thunderbirds).
La canción ha sido utilizada en varias series y spots televisivos, y como banda sonora de películas, la más popular sin duda, es el film de terror “Fallen” de 1998, protagonizada por Denzel Washington.
Juanmy “The Hunter”

“Time Is on My Side” es una de esas canciones que forman parte del top de Poision Ivy Lovers, escrita por Jerry Ragovoy, bajo el seudónimo “Norman Meade”. Fue grabada por primera vez por el trombonista de jazz Kai Winding en 1963. Winding era un reputado músico de Jazzy Pop Dionne Warwick, Dee Dee Warwick y Cissy Houston reconocida por el trombonista de Jazz y pop que había pasado por de las bandas de Benny Goodman y Stan Kenton. En 1963, Winding, había conseguido un éxito notable con el tema instrumental “More”, incluido en el Lp “!!! More !!!” (Theme From Mondo Cane)” para el sello Verve Records, disco que aprovecho para recomendar desde aquí, Easy Listen, Surf, Pop Exotica se dan la mano en un disco maravilloso, donde cohabitan el “Pipeline” de The Chantays, “Comin’ Home Baby” de Mel Torme, o la maravillosa “More”, de Riz Ortolani y Nino Oliviero, esta última con un tratamiento en clave Surf que recuerda a “Telstar” de The Tornadoes, por algo en la contraportada de este LP aparece el subtítulo “Soul Surfin’”. El comentar brevemente este disco es fundamental para entender por qué parámetros musicales se movía Kai Winding en esos momentos, pese a tener 41 años en 1963, Winding absorbía estilos musicales como el Surf, que eran puramente juveniles.
“Time Is on My Side” fue grabada en Octubre de 1963 para el sello Verve, la canción fue concebida como un tema instrumental, que contaba con un coro, en principio se pensó en unas voces de fondo, que repetían el título de la canción. Al final el coro quedó más presente de lo que se pensó en un principio, y menos mal que fue así, ya que las encargadas de las voces fueron nada más y nada menos que Cissy Houston, Dionne Warwick y Dee Dee Warwick.
La canción ha sido versionada infinidad de veces, Irma Thomas, The Rolling Stones, Wilson Pickett, Paul Revere & The Raiders, Moody Blues, Brian Poole & The Tremeloes, The O’jays, The Pretty Things, Blondie, Patty Smith, Tracy Nelson, Kim Wilson y muchos más la han grabado o versionado en directo. Las más destacables de estas versiones son, sin duda, la de Irma Thomas y la de The Rollings Stones.
La versión de Irma Thomas se grabó en 1964 para Imperial Records, y fue la primera que tuvo letra completa, Jimmy Norman fue el encargado de crear la letra. Apareció como cara B del tema “Anyone Who Knows What Love Is (Will Understand)”. La versión de Irma Thomas fue la que The Rolling Stones versionaron, y con su interpretación consiguieron llegar a todo lo alto de las listas, fueron número 1 en UK y número 6 en USA. Fue la primera canción de The Rolling Stones en entrar en el Top Ten estadounidense.
The Rolling Stones la grabaron dos veces, en 1964 la incluyeron en su álbum “12×5”, y en 1965 en su disco “The Rolling Stones 2”, las dos cuentan con intros diferentes.
Creo que además de citar estas dos versiones como las más destacadas, hay que mencionar también las versiones que hicieron Wilson Pickett, Paul Revere & The Raiders y Kim Wilson (The Fabulous Thunderbirds).
La canción ha sido utilizada en varias series y spots televisivos, y como banda sonora de películas, la más popular sin duda, es el film de terror “Fallen” de 1998, protagonizada por Denzel Washington.

Juanmy “The Hunter”

Time is on my side, yes it is
Time is on my side, yes it is

Now you always say
That you want to be free
But you’ll come running back (said you would baby)
You’ll come running back (I said so many times before)
You’ll come running back to me

Oh, time is on my side, yes it is
Time is on my side, yes it is

You’re searching for good times
But just wait and see
You’ll come running back (I won’t have to worry no more)
You’ll come running back (spend the rest of my life with you, baby)
You’ll come running back to me

Go ahead, go ahead and light up the town
And baby, do everything your heart desires
Remember, I’ll always be around
And I know, I know
Like I told you so many times before
You’re gonna come back, baby
‘Cause I know
You’re gonna come back knocking
Yeah, knocking right on my door
Yes, yes!

Well, time is on my side, yes it is
Time is on my side, yes it is

‘Cause I got the real love
The kind that you need
You’ll come running back (said you would, baby)
You’ll come running back (I always said you would)
You’ll come running back, to me
Yes time, time, time is on my side, yes it is
Time, time, time is on my side, yes it is
Oh, time, time, time is on my side, yes it is
I said, time, time, time is on my side, yes it is
Oh, time, time, time is on my side
Yeah, time, time, time is on my side

Hanky Panky (by Jeff Barry and Ellie Greenwich)

Si pensamos en canciones icónicas de la primera mitad de los 60’s, que representen el espíritu del Frat Rock, rápidamente nos vienen a la mente “Louie Louie”, en la versión de The Kingsmen, “Shout” de The Isley Brothers, “Double Shot Of My Baby´s Love” en la versión de The Swingin´Medallions, “little Latin Lupe Lu” de The Righteous Brothers, “Wooly Bully” de Sam The Sham & The Pharaos, “Hang On Sloopy” de The McCoys o la canción de la que va este post, “Hanky Panky”.

Jeff Barry y Ellie Greenwich compusieron “Hanky Panky” en 1963. La canción, en un principio, fue concebida para rellenar la cara B del single “That Boy John” de The Raindrops, el grupo de Barry y Greenwich, la escribieron en 20 minutos y según explicó Barry en una entrevista, la canción les parecía malísima, de lo peor que habían compuesto, nunca pensaron que el tema pudiera convertirse en un éxito posteriormente, era una canción de relleno para una cara B hecha a la carrera, hay que tener en cuenta que la pareja tenía el listón muy alto, componían temas como “Be My Baby”, “Chapel of Love”, “Leader of the Pack” o “Da Doo Ron Ron”.

El Single de The Raindrops con el tema “That Boy John” consiguió llegar al número 64 en las listas de éxitos, pero su cara B no pasó desapercibida, y ya en 1963 The Summits hicieron una versión en clave R&B muy buena, a mi gusto de las mejores que se han grabado de este tema, aunque sin ningún éxito. Poco a poco la canción se convirtió en un clásico en el repertorio de grupos de Frat Rock, o Garage primerizo, y era muy habitual que este tipo de grupos la versionaran en directo. Así fue como Tommy James descubrió la canción, una noche se la escuchó tocar a una banda de Garage en un club en South Bend, Indiana. “Realmente sólo recordaba algunas líneas de la canción, así que cuando fuimos a grabarla, tuve que improvisar el resto de la canción”, explico James en una entrevista. “Simplemente la reconstruí de lo que recordaba” La versión de The Shondells cambia un poco la letra de la original, en la de The Raindrops se nombra a The Drifters, The Tokens y The Coasters y en la de The Shondells hay una pequeña insinuación de índole sexual además de omitir los grupos antes citados.

La versión de The Shondells, que era como se llamaba el grupo de Tommy James por aquel entonces se grabó en febrero de 1964, en una estación de radio local, la WNIL en Niles, Michigan, y se lanzó en el sello local Snap Records, el single funcionó muy bien en el área de Michigan, Indiana e Illinois, pero al no tener distribución nacional después de un tiempo simplemente desapareció.

The Shondells se habían formado mientras sus miembros estaban en la escuela, bajo el nombre de Tom and the Tornadoes, James tenía 12 años cuando comenzó con el grupo. Mas tarde, con sus miembros ya en la escuela secundaria, James decidió renombrar al grupo como The Shondells, en honor a uno de sus ídolos, el guitarrista Troy Shondell, y así, bajo este nombre es como grabaron “Hanky Panky”. Como tantos grupos de esa época, tras acabar este periodo escolar decidieron disolverse. Tan solo Tommy James había decidido continuar con su carrera musical.

En 1965, James se encontraba con pocas perspectivas laborales, pero su suerte cambió cuando el disc jockey de Pittsburgh “Mad Mike” Metrovich contacto con él. Metrovich ponía constantemente la versión de “Hanky Panky” de The Shondells, y el disco se había convertido en un éxito en esa área. James decidió volver a reunir a The Shondells y relanzar la canción, no lo consiguió, ya que ninguno de los miembros del grupo estaba dispuesto a volver al mundo de la música, para ellos solo había sido un hobby mientras estudiaban, así que James viajo a Pittsburgh, para buscar banda y fue allí donde se tropezó The Raconteurs, que se convertirían en los nuevos Shondells.

Rápidamente, Tommy James & The Shondells, que era ahora el nombre del grupo, consiguieron apariciones en televisión y en clubes de la ciudad, James llevó el master de “Hanky Panky” a Nueva York, donde lo vendió a Roulette Records. Curiosamente no se volvió a grabar la canción, según el propio James ha dicho en más de una ocasión, “No creo que nadie pueda grabar una canción tan mala y hacer que suene bien. Tenía que sonar como un grupo de aficionados. Creo que si la hubiéramos re grabado la habríamos estropeado”. La canción fue lanzada por Roulette llegó rápidamente a n. º1 del Billboard Hot 100 de EE. UU, durante dos semanas en julio de 1966. A partir de aquí Tommy James & The Shondells se convirtieron en uno de los grupos más exitosos de Pop de la década de los 60’s, con un buen montón de éxitos, a nivel internacional, como, “I Think We’re Alone Now”, “Mony Mony”, “Sweet Cherry Wine”, “Crystal Blue Persuasion”, “Gettin’ Together” o “Crimson And Clover”, con esta última lograron su segundo nº1en USA.

“Hanky Panky” se convirtió gracias a la versión de Tommy James en uno de los himnos juveniles de los 60’s y a lo largo de los años ha contado con cientos de versiones. The Cramps, The Ventures, Neil Diamond, The Rivieras, The Outsiders, Joan Jett, The Sonics, Link Protrudi, The Mojo Men, Rita Chao y muchos más la han grabado o tocado en directo. Sin duda sigue siendo una de esas canciones indispensable en una buena juerga, de las que incitan a gritar “Toga,Toga,Toga”.

Juanmy “The Hunter”

My baby does the hanky panky
My baby does the hanky panky
My baby does the hanky panky
My baby does the hanky panky
My baby does the hanky panky

My baby does the hanky panky
My baby does the hanky panky
My baby does the hanky panky
My baby does the hanky panky
My baby does the hanky panky

I saw her walkin’ on down the line
You know I saw her for the very first time
A pretty little girl standin’ all alone
“Hey pretty baby, can I take you home?”
I never saw her, never really saw her

My baby does the hanky panky
My baby does the hanky panky
My baby does the hanky panky
My baby does the hanky panky
My baby does the hanky panky

I saw her walkin’ on down the line
You know I saw her for the very first time
A pretty little girl standin’ all alone
“Hey pretty baby, can I take you home?”
I never saw her, never really saw her

My baby does the hanky panky
My baby does the hanky panky
My baby does the hanky panky
My baby does the hanky panky
My baby does the hanky panky

My baby does the hanky panky
My baby does the hanky panky
My baby does the hanky panky

Hanky Panky (by Jeff Barry and Ellie Greenwich)

If we think of iconic songs from the first half of the 60’s, that represent the spirit of Frat Rock, “Louie Louie” quickly comes to my mind, in The Kingsmen’s version, “Shout” by The Isley Brothers, “Double Shot Of My Baby´s Love ”in the version of The Swingin´Medallions,“ little Latin Lupe Lu ”by The Righteous Brothers,“ Wooly Bully ”by Sam The Sham & The Pharaos,“ Hang On Sloopy ”by The McCoys or the song which this post is about, “Hanky ​​Panky”.

Jeff Barry and Ellie Greenwich composed “Hanky ​​Panky” in 1963. The song was originally intended to fill in the B-side of The Raindrops’ single “That Boy John” by Barry and Greenwich group, they wrote it in 20 minutes and as Barry explained in an interview, the song seemed terrible to them, one of the worst song they had composed, they never thought that the song could become a success later, it was a filler song for a B-side made on the run, you have to have considering that the couple had a very high bar, they composed songs like “Be My Baby”, “Chapel of Love”, “Leader of the Pack” or “Da Doo Ron Ron”.

The Raindrops Single with the song “That Boy John” managed to reach number 64 in the charts, but his B-side did not go unnoticed, and already in 1963 The Summits made a very good R&B version of the code, to my liking of the best that have been recorded on this subject, although without any success. Little by little the song became a classic in the repertoire of groups of Frat Rock, or first-timer Garage, and it was very common for these types of groups to cover it live. That’s how Tommy James discovered the song, one night he was heard playing a Garage band at a club in South Bend, Indiana. “I really only remembered a few lines from the song, so when we went to record it, I had to improvise the rest of the song,” James explained in an interview. “I just rebuilt it from what I remembered.” The version of The Shondells changes the lyrics of the original a bit, in The Raindrops the Drifters, The Tokens and The Coasters are named and in The Shondells there is a small suggestion of a sexual nature in addition to omitting the aforementioned groups.

The version of The Shondells, which was the name of the Tommy James group at the time, was recorded in February 1964, on a local radio station, WNIL in Niles, Michigan, and was released on the local label Snap Records, the single performed very well in the Michigan, Indiana and Illinois area, but having no national distribution after a while simply disappeared.

The Shondells had been formed while its members were at school, under the name of Tom and the Tornadoes, James was 12 years old when he started with the group. Later, with their members already in high school, James decided to rename the group as The Shondells, in honour of one of their idols, the guitarist Troy Shondell, and thus, under this name is how they recorded “Hanky ​​Panky”. Like so many groups of that time, after finishing this school period they decided to dissolve. Only Tommy James had decided to continue his musical career.

In 1965, James found himself with little job prospects, but his luck changed when Pittsburgh disc jockey “Mad Mike” Metrovich contacted him. Metrovich was constantly putting on the “Hanky ​​Panky” version of The Shondells, and the album had become a hit in that area. James decided to assemble The Shondells and relaunch the song, he did not succeed, since none of the members of the group was willing to return to the world of music, for them it had only been a hobby while they studied, so James travelled to Pittsburgh, to search for a band and it was there that The Raconteurs stumbled, who would become the new Shondells.

Quickly, Tommy James & The Shondells, which was now the name of the group, got appearances on television and in city clubs, James brought the master of “Hanky ​​Panky” to New York, where he sold it to Roulette Records. Oddly, the song was never re-recorded, as James himself has said on more than one occasion, “I don’t think anybody can record such a bad song and make it sound good. It had to sound like a group of fans. I think so we would have re-recorded it we would have spoiled it. ” The song was released by Roulette quickly reached n.# 1 on the Billboard Hot 100 in the USA, for two weeks in July 1966. From here on Tommy James & The Shondells became one of the most successful Pop groups of the 60’s, with a lot of International successes such as “I Think We’re Alone Now”, “Mony Mony”, “Sweet Cherry Wine”, “Crystal Blue Persuasion”, “Gettin ‘Together” or “Crimson And Clover”, with the latter They achieved their second No. 1 in the USA.

Thanks to the Tommy James version, “Hanky Panky” became one of the youth anthems of the 1960s and over the years has had hundreds of versions. The Cramps, The Ventures, Neil Diamond, The Rivieras, The Outsiders, Joan Jett, The Sonics, Link Protrudi, The Mojo Men, Rita Chao and many more have recorded or played it live. Undoubtedly, it is still one of those indispensable songs in a good party, one of those that incites to shout “Toga, Toga, Toga”.

Juanmy “The Hunter”

My baby does the hanky panky
My baby does the hanky panky
My baby does the hanky panky
My baby does the hanky panky
My baby does the hanky panky

My baby does the hanky panky
My baby does the hanky panky
My baby does the hanky panky
My baby does the hanky panky
My baby does the hanky panky

I saw her walkin’ on down the line
You know I saw her for the very first time
A pretty little girl standin’ all alone
“Hey pretty baby, can I take you home?”
I never saw her, never really saw her

My baby does the hanky panky
My baby does the hanky panky
My baby does the hanky panky
My baby does the hanky panky
My baby does the hanky panky

I saw her walkin’ on down the line
You know I saw her for the very first time
A pretty little girl standin’ all alone
“Hey pretty baby, can I take you home?”
I never saw her, never really saw her

My baby does the hanky panky
My baby does the hanky panky
My baby does the hanky panky
My baby does the hanky panky
My baby does the hanky panky

My baby does the hanky panky
My baby does the hanky panky
My baby does the hanky panky

Barbara Lynn – You’ll Lose A Good Thing

“You’ll lose a good thing”, es una canción compuesta por Barbara Lynn, que apareció en 1962 como sencillo para el sello Jamie. En 1963 fue incluida dentro del Lp debut de Barbara Lynn, también en el sello Jamie. La canción fue un gran éxito que llego al puesto n.º 8 en listas nacionales de USA y n.º 1 en las de R&B. Entre las versiones más destacables de este tema figuran la de Aretha Franklin de 1964, para su álbum “Runnin’ Out of Fools”, la de Freddy Fender de 1976, que llego a n.º 1 en la lista de singles de la revista Billboard magazine Hot Country, está incluida en el Lp de Fender de 1976 “Rock ‘N’ Country”, también se han hecho multitud de versiones en clave Rocksteady, Audrey, Johnny Clarke o Madness son algunos de los intérpretes que la han versionado de este modo. Por último, cabe destacar la magnífica versión en español de Big Sandy con Los Straitjackets, titulada “Tú te vas”, que aparece en el Lp de Los Straitjackets “Rock en español Vol1” de 2007.

“You’ll lose a good thing”, es una canción compuesta por Barbara Lynn, que apareció en 1962 como sencillo para el sello Jamie. En 1963 fue incluida dentro del Lp debut de Barbara Lynn, también en el sello Jamie. La canción fue un gran éxito que llego al puesto n.º 8 en listas nacionales de USA y n.º 1 en las de R&B. Entre las versiones más destacables de este tema figuran la de Aretha Franklin de 1964, para su álbum “Runnin’ Out of Fools”, la de Freddy Fender de 1976, que llego a n.º 1 en la lista de singles de la revista Billboard magazine Hot Country, está incluida en el Lp de Fender de 1976 “Rock ‘N’ Country”, también se han hecho multitud de versiones en clave Rocksteady, Audrey, Johnny Clarke o Madness son algunos de los intérpretes que la han versionado de este modo. Por último, cabe destacar la magnífica versión en español de Big Sandy con Los Straitjackets, titulada “Tú te vas”, que aparece en el Lp de Los Straitjackets “Rock en español Vol1” de 2007.

Juanmy “The Hunter”

If you should lose me
Oh yeah, you’ll lose a good thing
If you should lose me
Oh yeah, you’ll lose a good thing
You know I love you, do anything for you
Just don’t mistreat me and I’ll be good to you
‘Cause if you should lose me
Oh yeah, you’ll lose a good thing
I’m givin’ you one more chance for you to do right
If you’ll only straighten up, we’ll have a good life
‘Cause if you should lose me
Oh yeah, you’ll lose a good thing
This is my last time, not asking any more
If you don’t do right, I’m gonna march outta that door
And if you don’t believe me
Just try it daddy and you’ll lose a good thing
Just try it daddy and you’ll lose a good thing
Just try it daddy and you’ll lose a good thing
Just try it daddy and you’ll lose a good thing
Just try it daddy and you’ll lose a good thing

Barbara Lynn – You’ll Lose A Good Thing (The Perfect R&B Ballad)

“You’ll lose a good thing” is a song composed by Barbara Lynn, which appeared in 1962 as a single for the Jamie label. In 1963 it was included in Barbara Lynn’s debut LP, also on the Jamie label. The song was a huge success, reaching # 8 on the US national charts and # 1 on the R&B charts. Among the most notable versions of this song are Aretha Franklin’s from 1964, for her album “Runnin’ Out of Fools”, Freddy Fender’s from 1976, which reached # 1 on Billboard magazine’s singles list. Hot Country magazine, is included in the 1976 Fender Lp “Rock ‘N’ Country”, there have also been many versions in code Rocksteady, Audrey, Johnny Clarke or Madness are some of the interpreters who have versioned it in this way. Lastly, it is worth noting the magnificent Spanish version of Big Sandy with Los Straitjackets, titled “Tú te vas”, which appears in the Strapjackets LP “Rock en español Vol1” from 2007.

Juanmy “The Hunter”.

If you should lose me
Oh yeah, you’ll lose a good thing
If you should lose me
Oh yeah, you’ll lose a good thing
You know I love you, do anything for you
Just don’t mistreat me and I’ll be good to you
‘Cause if you should lose me
Oh yeah, you’ll lose a good thing
I’m givin’ you one more chance for you to do right
If you’ll only straighten up, we’ll have a good life
‘Cause if you should lose me
Oh yeah, you’ll lose a good thing
This is my last time, not asking any more
If you don’t do right, I’m gonna march outta that door
And if you don’t believe me
Just try it daddy and you’ll lose a good thing
Just try it daddy and you’ll lose a good thing
Just try it daddy and you’ll lose a good thing
Just try it daddy and you’ll lose a good thing
Just try it daddy and you’ll lose a good thing

Max Crook “The Man From The Musitron”

On July 1 Max Crook left us. Many of you may wonder who Max Crook was, although most people have heard his best-known solo on many occasions. Max Crook was the co-author of one of the most famous songs in Rock history and his masterful solo by Musitron, the song in question is “Runaway” by Del Shannon.

Maxfield Doyle Crook was born on November 2, 1936, in Lincoln, Nebraska. Crook learned to play the accordion as a child, and then switched to the piano, when he was fourteen, he had already built his own studio. In 1957, during his college years he formed a Rock & Roll group called The White Bucks, with which he recorded a single, “Get That Fly”, on Dot Records in 1959.

During 1959 Crook built a monophonic synthesizer, which he named Musitron, from a Clavioline, to which he had previously improved and added television tubes, and parts of household appliances, an old amplifier, and a reel-to-reel tape machine. Crook was unable to patent the Musitron because most of its components were already proprietary products, a pity. The first time he used it to record was in a session in Berry Gordy’s studio in Detroit, in an unpublished version of “Bumble Boogie” (the song, later, would be recorded by B. Bumble & The Stingers), in this Session also used a four track recorder that he had also built himself. The Musitron has had a true legion of followers, among musicians and producers, among them are Berry Gordy, Enio Morricone, John Barry, Joe Meek, Roy Wood, and many more, although, perhaps, the most outstanding fan of this instrument and Max Crook’s is Jeff Lynne, who is also an avowed fan of Del Shannon.

1959 was a very important year for Crook, it was the year he met Del Shannon, at that time he had not yet adopted the stage name with which he would become famous, and his band called itself “Charlie Johnson & The Little Big Show Band”, Shannon asked Crook to join his band as a keyboard player. They signed a recording contract in 1960, and Crook began playing the Musitron, for the first time in public with notable acceptance. During a concert at the Hi-Lo Club in Battle Creek, Michigan, Crook came up with an unusual chord change: going from A-minor to G, Shannon added a lyric, and while Crook improvised, Musitron’s magnificent solo appeared. According to Crook himself, it was practically not retouched, and it was definitely recorded in the studio as it was created in that improvisation, “Runaway” was born, one of the greatest songs of the 20th century.

In 1961, “Runaway” was released by the Bigtop Records label and reached the top of the American hit list, and soon became an international hit. Its melody became so famous that everyone wanted to know the name of the mysterious instrument that made that sharp sound in their spectacular solo, the American Bandstand program held a quiz to guess the instrument.

Crook’s story does not end with “Runaway”, he also recorded a series of really good instrumentals, combining his solo career with his work with Del Shannon. His solo songs were recorded under the stage name of Maximiliano. “The Snake”, “The Twistin’ Ghost” or “Greyhound” were some of these songs, achieving a couple of hits in Canada or curiously, in countries like Argentina. For a time, he was the leader of Shannon’s group, which became “The Maximilian Band,” but left the group in late 1962, to fully pursue his solo career. He also created his own record label, Doble A, in Ann Arbor. Later, in the late 60’s, he formed an electronic musical duo with Scott Ludwig, called “The Sounds of Tomorrow”, making great instrumental versions of the hits of the moment, developing a unique style, within the genre of Exotic with a futuristic touch. Max Crook never abandoned music, even composing soundtracks. Max was another one of those musicians hidden behind a great performer or a great song, from Poison Ivy Lovers we want to shed a little light on this great performer, who has undoubtedly been very influential among generations of later musicians.

Juanmy “The Hunter”

Max Crook “El hombre del Musitron”

EL día 1 de julio nos dejó Max Crook. Muchos os preguntareis quien era Max Crook, aunque la mayoría de los mortales han escuchado en muchas ocasiones su solo más conocido. Max Crook fue el coautor de una de las canciones más famosas de la historia del Rock y de su magistral solo de Musitron, la canción en cuestión es “Runaway” de Del Shannon.
Maxfield Doyle Crook nació el 2 de noviembre de 1936, en Lincoln, Nebraska. Crook aprendió a tocar el acordeón siendo un niño, para después pasar al piano, cuando tenía catorce años ya había construido su propio estudio. En 1957, durante sus años en la universidad formó un grupo de Rock & Roll llamado The White Bucks, con los que grabó un single, “Get That Fly”, en Dot Records en 1959.
Durante 1959 Crook construyó un sintetizador monofónico, al que puso el nombre de Musitron, a partir de un Clavioline, al que previamente había mejorado y añadido tubos de televisión, y partes de aparatos electrodomésticos, un viejo amplificador, y una máquina de cinta de carrete a carrete. Crook no pudo patentar el Musitron porque la mayoría de sus componentes ya eran productos patentados, una verdadera pena. La primera vez que lo utilizó para grabar fue en una sesión en el estudio de Berry Gordy en Detroit, en una versión inédita de “Bumble Boogie” (la canción, más tarde, seria grabada por B. Bumble & The Stingers), en esta sesión también utilizó una grabadora cuatro pistas que también había construido él mismo. El Musitron ha tenido una verdadera legión de seguidores, entre músicos y productores, entre ellos se encuentran Berry Gordy, Enio Morricone, John Barry, Joe Meek, Roy Wood, y muchos más, aunque, quizá, el fan más destacado de este instrumento y del propio Max Crook es Jeff Lynne, que también es un fan declarado de Del Shannon.
1959 fue un año muy importante para Crook, fue el año en que conoció a Del Shannon, por aquel entonces no había adoptado todavía el nombre artístico con el que se haría famoso, y su banda se hacía llamar “Charlie Johnson & The Little Big Show Band”, Shannon pidió a Crook que se uniera a su banda como teclista. Firmaron un contrato de grabación en 1960, y Crook comenzó a tocar el Musitron, por primera vez en público con notable aceptación. Durante un concierto en el Hi-Lo Club en Battle Creek, Michigan, a Crook se le ocurrió un cambio de acorde inusual: ir de A-menor a G, Shannon añadió una letra y mientras Crook improvisaba apareció el magnífico solo de Musitron, que según el propio Crook, prácticamente no se retocó, y se grabó definitivamente en el estudio tal y como se creó en aquella improvisación, había nacido “Runaway” una de las canciones más grandes del siglo XX.
En 1961, “Runaway” fue editada por el sello Bigtop Records y llegó a los primeros puestos de la lista de éxitos americana, y muy pronto se convirtió en un éxito internacional. Su melodía se hizo tan famosa que todo el mundo quería saber el nombre del misterioso instrumento que emitía ese agudo sonido en su espectacular solo, el programa American Bandstand llevó a cabo un concurso para adivinar el instrumento.
La historia de Crook no acaba con “Runaway”, también grabó una serie de instrumentales realmente buenos, compaginando su carrera en solitario con su trabajo con Del Shannon. Sus temas en solitario se grabaron bajo el nombre artístico de Maximiliano. «The Snake», “The Twistin’ Ghost” o “Greyhound”, fueron algunos de estas canciones, consiguiendo un par de éxitos en Canadá o curiosamente, en países como Argentina. Durante un tiempo fue el líder del grupo de Shannon, que se convirtió en “La banda Maximiliano”, pero dejó el grupo a finales de 1962, para dedicarse plenamente a su carrera en solitario. También creó su propio sello discográfico, Doble A, en Ann Arbor. Más tarde, a finales de la década de los 60´s, formó un dúo musical electrónico con Scott Ludwig, llamado “The Sounds of Tomorrow”, realizando geniales versiones instrumentales de los éxitos del momento, desarrollando un estilo único, dentro del género de la Exótica con un toque futurista. Max Crook no abandonó nunca la música, componiendo incluso bandas sonoras. Max fue otro de esos músicos escondidos tras un gran interprete o una gran canción, desde Poison Ivy Lovers queremos arrojar un poco de luz sobre este gran interprete, que sin duda ha sido muy influyente entre generaciones de músicos posteriores.
Juanmy “The Hunter”

Richard “Popcorn” Wylie (El gran desconocido de la Motown)

El tema “Money (Thats What i want)”, originalmente grabado por Barret Strong en 1959, es una de las canciones más versionadas de toda la historia del Rock. Un tema de R’n’B que ya daba pistas de cómo seria la música Soul que estaba a punto de invadir las listas de éxito estadounidenses.

La canción, en la línea de lo que Ray Charles estaba grabando en esos años, es un tema muy novedoso a caballo entre el Rock & Roll de los 50’s y lo que vendría unos pocos años después, tuvo un impacto tremendo en todos los grupos ingleses de los primeros 60’s, casi todas las bandas de Merseybeat hicieron su versión, y montones de grupos americanos de Frat Rock, Surf, etc, también. Dick Dale, The Beatles, The Astronauts, The Searchers, The Sonics, Jerry Lee Lewis, The Kingsmen, Roy Orbison, o una de las versiones más salvajes que conozco, la de Richard Wayne Wylie, también conocido como “Popcorn” Wylie, con un piano desafinado a propósito y a contratiempo, La versión de “Popcorn” Wilie y la de Jerry Lee Lewis son mis favoritas, una verdadera burrada que me hizo investigar a este personaje.

“Popcorn” Wylie fue uno de los músicos principales de los primeros años del sello Motown.
Wylie nació en Detroit, Michigan, pertenecía a una familia de músicos, aprendió a tocar el piano siendo un niño. Asistió a la Northwestern High School donde practicó el futbol, fueron los miembros de su equipo los que le apodaron “Popcorn”. Mientras estaba en la escuela, formó un grupo, Popcorn and the Mohawks, que también incluyó a los músicos y productores de Motown James Jamerson, Clifford Mack, Eddie Willis, Mike Terry, Lamont Dozier y Norman Whitfield. La banda funcionó a nivel local, Wylie era el líder de la banda y salía a escena con un tocado Mohawk.

En 1960, lanzó un sencillo en solitario, “Pretty Girl”, en el sello local Northern. También actuó en un club de Detroit, Twenty Grand, donde conoció al músico Robert Bateman, que trabajaba como ingeniero en la incipiente etiqueta Motown de Berry Gordy. Wylie luego comenzó a grabar para Motown, lanzando tres singles sin éxito como Popcorn and the Mohawks: “Custer’s Last Man” / “Shimmy Gully”, seguido de una versión de “Money (That What Want) de Barrett Strong”, y luego “Real Good Lovin'”. También grabó con Janie Bradford como dúo y comenzó a trabajar como músico de sesión. Tocó el piano en el tema de The Miracles “Shop Around” de 1961 y en “Please Mr. Postman” de The Marvelettes, y además trabajó con The Contours, Marvin Gaye, Marv Johnson, The Supremes, Martha & the Vandellas y Mary Wells. Fue el primer jefe de A&R de Motown, y líder de la banda para la primera gira de Motortown Revue en 1962.

En 1962 dejó Motown después de un desacuerdo con Gordy, quien al parecer, le guarda rencor eterno, ya que no mencionó su nombre en su autobiografía posterior. Wylie firmó con Epic Records, lanzando cuatro singles entre 1962 y 1964 en los que fue respaldado por Sun Ra y miembros de su Arkestra. Más tarde trabajó como compositor, y productor para varios sellos locales, incluidos SonBert, Ric-Tic, Correc-tone, Continental y Golden World. También formó sus propios sellos, Pameline y SoulHawk a mediados de los 60’s. Durante este período, trabajó mucho con los cantantes Edwin Starr y J.J. Barnes, y coescribió el tema de Jamo Thomas “I Spy (For the FBI)”. También coescribió el tema de The Platters de 1967, “With This Ring”. Muchos de estos discos se hicieron muy conocidos en la escena del Northern Soul de finales de los 60’s y primeros 70’s.

Siguió trabajando como productor, compositor y ocasionalmente como músico, durante toda la década de los 70 y 80’s y 90’s del siglo pasado, escribiendo nuevos temas para The Contours o The Elgins, entre otros. Muchas de sus grabaciones del sello Pameline se publicaron en una recompilación titulada, Popcorn’s Detroit Soul Party en 2002, y también participó en un documental de 2003, The Strange World of Northern Soul. Falleció en 2008 a causa de un problema cardíaco.

Juanmy “The Hunter”

Richard “Popcorn” Wylie (The great unknown of Motown)

The song “Money (That’s What I Want)”, originally recorded by Barret Strong in 1959, is one of the most versioned songs in the entire history of Rock. A R’n’B theme that already hinted at what the Soul music that was about to invade the American hit charts would be like.

The song, in line with what Ray Charles was recording in those years, is a very novel song straddling the Rock & Roll of the 50’s and what would come a few years later, had a tremendous impact on all English groups From the early 60’s, almost all Merseybeat bands did their version, and lots of American bands from Frat Rock, Surf, etc, too. Dick Dale, The Beatles, The Astronauts, The Searchers, The Sonics, Jerry Lee Lewis, The Kingsmen, Roy Orbison, or one of the wildest versions I know of, that of Richard Wayne Wylie, also known as “Popcorn” Wylie, with a piano out of tune on purpose and mishap, The version of “Popcorn” Wilie and Jerry Lee Lewis are my favorites, a real fool that made me investigate this character.

“Popcorn” Wylie was one of the leading musicians in the early years of the Motown label.

Wylie was born in Detroit, Michigan, belonged to a family of musicians, learned to play the piano as a child. He attended Northwestern High School where he played soccer, it was his team members who nicknamed him “Popcorn”. While at school, he formed a group, Popcorn and the Mohawks, which also included Motown musicians and producers James Jamerson, Clifford Mack, Eddie Willis, Mike Terry, Lamont Dozier, and Norman Whitfield. The band operated locally, Wylie was the leader of the band and was onstage wearing a Mohawk headdress.

In 1960, he released a solo single, “Pretty Girl”, on the local Northern label. He also performed at a Detroit club, Twenty Grand, where he met musician Robert Bateman, who was working as an engineer on Berry Gordy’s fledgling Motown label. Wylie then started recording for Motown, releasing three unsuccessful singles like Popcorn and the Mohawks: “Custer’s Last Man” / “Shimmy Gully”, followed by a cover of “Money (That What Want) by Barrett Strong,” and then “Real Good Lovin ‘.” He also recorded with Janie Bradford as a duo and began working as a session musician. He played the piano on the 1961 The Miracles track “Shop Around” and on The Marvelettes’ “Please Mr. Postman”, and also worked with The Contours, Marvin Gaye, Marv Johnson, The Supremes, Martha & the Vandellas and Mary Wells. He was Motown’s first A&R chief, and band leader for the first Motortown Revue tour in 1962.

In 1962 he left Motown after a disagreement with Gordy, who apparently holds him an eternal grudge, as he did not mention his name in his subsequent autobiography. Wylie signed with Epic Records, releasing four singles between 1962 and 1964 in which he was backed by Sun Ra and members of his Arkestra. He later worked as a songwriter, and producer for various local labels, including SonBert, Ric-Tic, Correc-tone, Continental, and Golden World. He also formed his own labels, Pameline and SoulHawk in the mid-1960s. During this period, he worked extensively with singers Edwin Starr and J.J. Barnes, and co-wrote the Jamo Thomas song “I Spy (For the FBI)”. He also co-wrote the 1967 The Platters song “With This Ring”. Many of these records became well known in the Northern Soul scene of the late 1960s and early 1970s.

He continued working as a producer, composer, and occasionally as a musician, throughout the 70s and 80s and 90s of the last century, writing new songs for The Contours or The Elgins, among others. Many of his recordings from the Pameline label were released in a recompilation titled, Popcorn’s Detroit Soul Party in 2002, and he also starred in a 2003 documentary, The Strange World of Northern Soul. He passed away in 2008 from a heart problem.

Juanmy “The Hunter”

Paul Peek (Blue Cap Boy)

Todos los músicos que acompañaron a Gene Vincent, durante toda su carrera, fueron de lo mejorcito de su época, Cliff Gallup, Johnny Meeks, Dickie Harrel, etc. Pero hay uno, que formó parte de la segunda formación de los Blue Caps al que le tengo un especial cariño, el gran Paul Peek.
Peek entró en la banda de Gene Vincent como sustituto del guitarra rítmica Wee Willie Williams, pero como todos los músicos que formaron parte de los Blue Caps no era un músico cualquiera. Paul Peek era un músico de gran talento, excelente cantante y muy buen guitarrista. En 1956 Paul debía incorporarse a la banda de Lefty Frizzel como steel guitar, pero un encuentro casual con Gene Vincent que estaba en todo lo alto de las listas con “Be Bop A Lula”, hizo que el joven Peek acabara formando parte de los Blue Caps.
Apareció junto a Vincent en la película “The Girl Can’t Help It”, interpretando “Be Bop A Lula”, en la escena de la película Peek está a la izquierda de Vincent con una guitarra acústica roja. Vincent era consciente de su falta de movilidad a causa de su lesión en la pierna que le obligaba a llevar un aparato ortopédico, y le dijo a Peek que se moviera a lo Elvis para que la actuación, que además era en playback, resultara más dinámica. El resultado fue que Paul Peek acaparó totalmente la cámara y convirtió la escena en mítica.
Paul Peek participó en la grabación de temas tan emblemáticos del repertorio de Vincent como “Unchained Melody”, “Cat Man” y “B-I-Bickey Bi Bo Bo Go” 0 “Pink Thunderbird”, esta última compuesta por Peek. También logró un honor singular como miembro de la banda cuando, durante el otoño de 1956, Vincent terminó grabando una de las canciones de Peek, También apareció con Vincent en otra película, Hot Rod Gang. Paul Peek estuvo con los Blue Caps hasta que Gene Vincent dejó de acompañarse por él a finales de los 50’s.
Paralelamente a sus años como miembro de los Blue Caps, Peek desarrolló una muy interesante carrera en solitario, lanzando más de 14 singles entre finales de los años 50 y la década de los 60’s.
Peek consiguió entrar en la lista de éxitos con “Brother-in-Law”, una canción respuesta a la “Mother-In-Law” de Ernie K-Doe. Como solista grabó un amplio abanico de estilos, R’n’B con sonido New Orleans, Rock & Roll, Northern Soul, Country, Rockabilly, baladas estilo High School, etc…. Además de todo lo mencionado Paul Peek fue responsable de que Esquerita pudiera conseguir un contrato en Capitol Records, Peek descubrió a Esquerita mientras tocaba en un club de mala muerte y quedó tan impresionado que le hizo grabar algunas demos en una estación de radio de Greenville (WESC) alrededor de 1958. En ese momento, Peek era miembro de los Blue Caps, que tenían contrato con Capitol Records. De estos contactos y la influencia de Paul Peek con Capitol Records vino un contrato discográfico para Esquerita. Peek incluso coescribió el tema “The Rock-Around” con Esquerita, que tocó el piano en la grabación.
Paul Peek fue el primer artista en grabar para el sello NRC (National Recording Corporation), este sello lanzó el single “The Rock Around” en 1958.
Desgraciadamente, Peek nunca logró llegar a la cima, sus problemas con el alcohol hicieron mella en él y se acrecentaron con los años.
En la década de 1980 se unió a Blue Caps para una gira por Europa, fue en esos años cuando conoció a Jeff Beck. Peek y Beck se convirtieron en admiradores mutuos, Beck también grabó “Pink Thunderbird” en su álbum Crazy Legs.
Los últimos años de Peek fueron difíciles, su consumo de alcohol había empeorado y había perdido un ojo en un accidente automovilístico. Su salud comenzó a empeorar a fines de la década de 1990 y murió a causa de una cirrosis hepática en 2001.
Juanmy “The Hunter”Todos los músicos que acompañaron a Gene Vincent, durante toda su carrera, fueron de lo mejorcito de su época, Cliff Gallup, Johnny Meeks, Dickie Harrel, etc. Pero hay uno, que formó parte de la segunda formación de los Blue Caps al que le tengo un especial cariño, el gran Paul Peek.
Peek entró en la banda de Gene Vincent como sustituto del guitarra rítmica Wee Willie Williams, pero como todos los músicos que formaron parte de los Blue Caps no era un músico cualquiera. Paul Peek era un músico de gran talento, excelente cantante y muy buen guitarrista. En 1956 Paul debía incorporarse a la banda de Lefty Frizzel como steel guitar, pero un encuentro casual con Gene Vincent que estaba en todo lo alto de las listas con “Be Bop A Lula”, hizo que el joven Peek acabara formando parte de los Blue Caps.
Apareció junto a Vincent en la película “The Girl Can’t Help It”, interpretando “Be Bop A Lula”, en la escena de la película Peek está a la izquierda de Vincent con una guitarra acústica roja. Vincent era consciente de su falta de movilidad a causa de su lesión en la pierna que le obligaba a llevar un aparato ortopédico, y le dijo a Peek que se moviera a lo Elvis para que la actuación, que además era en playback, resultara más dinámica. El resultado fue que Paul Peek acaparó totalmente la cámara y convirtió la escena en mítica.
Paul Peek participó en la grabación de temas tan emblemáticos del repertorio de Vincent como “Unchained Melody”, “Cat Man” y “B-I-Bickey Bi Bo Bo Go” 0 “Pink Thunderbird”, esta última compuesta por Peek. También logró un honor singular como miembro de la banda cuando, durante el otoño de 1956, Vincent terminó grabando una de las canciones de Peek, También apareció con Vincent en otra película, Hot Rod Gang. Paul Peek estuvo con los Blue Caps hasta que Gene Vincent dejó de acompañarse por él a finales de los 50’s.
Paralelamente a sus años como miembro de los Blue Caps, Peek desarrolló una muy interesante carrera en solitario, lanzando más de 14 singles entre finales de los años 50 y la década de los 60’s.
Peek consiguió entrar en la lista de éxitos con “Brother-in-Law”, una canción respuesta a la “Mother-In-Law” de Ernie K-Doe. Como solista grabó un amplio abanico de estilos, R’n’B con sonido New Orleans, Rock & Roll, Northern Soul, Country, Rockabilly, baladas estilo High School, etc…. Además de todo lo mencionado Paul Peek fue responsable de que Esquerita pudiera conseguir un contrato en Capitol Records, Peek descubrió a Esquerita mientras tocaba en un club de mala muerte y quedó tan impresionado que le hizo grabar algunas demos en una estación de radio de Greenville (WESC) alrededor de 1958. En ese momento, Peek era miembro de los Blue Caps, que tenían contrato con Capitol Records. De estos contactos y la influencia de Paul Peek con Capitol Records vino un contrato discográfico para Esquerita. Peek incluso coescribió el tema “The Rock-Around” con Esquerita, que tocó el piano en la grabación.
Paul Peek fue el primer artista en grabar para el sello NRC (National Recording Corporation), este sello lanzó el single “The Rock Around” en 1958.
Desgraciadamente, Peek nunca logró llegar a la cima, sus problemas con el alcohol hicieron mella en él y se acrecentaron con los años.
En la década de 1980 se unió a Blue Caps para una gira por Europa, fue en esos años cuando conoció a Jeff Beck. Peek y Beck se convirtieron en admiradores mutuos, Beck también grabó “Pink Thunderbird” en su álbum Crazy Legs.
Los últimos años de Peek fueron difíciles, su consumo de alcohol había empeorado y había perdido un ojo en un accidente automovilístico. Su salud comenzó a empeorar a fines de la década de 1990 y murió a causa de una cirrosis hepática en 2001.
Juanmy “The Hunter”

Todos los músicos que acompañaron a Gene Vincent, durante toda su carrera, fueron de lo mejorcito de su época, Cliff Gallup, Johnny Meeks, Dickie Harrel, etc. Pero hay uno, que formó parte de la segunda formación de los Blue Caps al que le tengo un especial cariño, el gran Paul Peek.
Peek entró en la banda de Gene Vincent como sustituto del guitarra rítmica Wee Willie Williams, pero como todos los músicos que formaron parte de los Blue Caps no era un músico cualquiera. Paul Peek era un músico de gran talento, excelente cantante y muy buen guitarrista. En 1956 Paul debía incorporarse a la banda de Lefty Frizzel como steel guitar, pero un encuentro casual con Gene Vincent que estaba en todo lo alto de las listas con “Be Bop A Lula”, hizo que el joven Peek acabara formando parte de los Blue Caps.
Apareció junto a Vincent en la película “The Girl Can’t Help It”, interpretando “Be Bop A Lula”, en la escena de la película Peek está a la izquierda de Vincent con una guitarra acústica roja. Vincent era consciente de su falta de movilidad a causa de su lesión en la pierna que le obligaba a llevar un aparato ortopédico, y le dijo a Peek que se moviera a lo Elvis para que la actuación, que además era en playback, resultara más dinámica. El resultado fue que Paul Peek acaparó totalmente la cámara y convirtió la escena en mítica.
Paul Peek participó en la grabación de temas tan emblemáticos del repertorio de Vincent como “Unchained Melody”, “Cat Man” y “B-I-Bickey Bi Bo Bo Go” 0 “Pink Thunderbird”, esta última compuesta por Peek. También logró un honor singular como miembro de la banda cuando, durante el otoño de 1956, Vincent terminó grabando una de las canciones de Peek, También apareció con Vincent en otra película, Hot Rod Gang. Paul Peek estuvo con los Blue Caps hasta que Gene Vincent dejó de acompañarse por él a finales de los 50’s.
Paralelamente a sus años como miembro de los Blue Caps, Peek desarrolló una muy interesante carrera en solitario, lanzando más de 14 singles entre finales de los años 50 y la década de los 60’s.
Peek consiguió entrar en la lista de éxitos con “Brother-in-Law”, una canción respuesta a la “Mother-In-Law” de Ernie K-Doe. Como solista grabó un amplio abanico de estilos, R’n’B con sonido New Orleans, Rock & Roll, Northern Soul, Country, Rockabilly, baladas estilo High School, etc…. Además de todo lo mencionado Paul Peek fue responsable de que Esquerita pudiera conseguir un contrato en Capitol Records, Peek descubrió a Esquerita mientras tocaba en un club de mala muerte y quedó tan impresionado que le hizo grabar algunas demos en una estación de radio de Greenville (WESC) alrededor de 1958. En ese momento, Peek era miembro de los Blue Caps, que tenían contrato con Capitol Records. De estos contactos y la influencia de Paul Peek con Capitol Records vino un contrato discográfico para Esquerita. Peek incluso coescribió el tema “The Rock-Around” con Esquerita, que tocó el piano en la grabación.
Paul Peek fue el primer artista en grabar para el sello NRC (National Recording Corporation), este sello lanzó el single “The Rock Around” en 1958.
Desgraciadamente, Peek nunca logró llegar a la cima, sus problemas con el alcohol hicieron mella en él y se acrecentaron con los años.
En la década de 1980 se unió a Blue Caps para una gira por Europa, fue en esos años cuando conoció a Jeff Beck. Peek y Beck se convirtieron en admiradores mutuos, Beck también grabó “Pink Thunderbird” en su álbum Crazy Legs.
Los últimos años de Peek fueron difíciles, su consumo de alcohol había empeorado y había perdido un ojo en un accidente automovilístico. Su salud comenzó a empeorar a fines de la década de 1990 y murió a causa de una cirrosis hepática en 2001.

Juanmy “The Hunter”

Paul Peek (Blue Cap Boy)

All the musicians who accompanied Gene Vincent throughout his career were the best of his time, Cliff Gallup, Johnny Meeks, Dickie Harrel, etc. But there is one, who was part of the second Blue Caps formation to whom I have a special affection, the great Paul Peek.

Peek joined Gene Vincent’s band as a substitute for its rhythm guitar Wee Willie Williams, but like all the musicians who were part of the Blue Caps he was not just any musician. Paul Peek was a very talented musician, excellent singer and a very good guitarist. In 1956 Paul was due to join Lefty Frizzel’s band as a steel guitar, but a chance encounter with Gene Vincent who was at the top of the charts with “Be Bop a Lula”, made the young Peek end up being part of the Blue Caps.

He appeared alongside Vincent in the movie “The Girl Can’t Help It”, playing “Be Bop a Lula”, in the scene of the movie Peek is to the left of Vincent with a red acoustic guitar. Vincent was aware of his lack of mobility due to his leg injury that forced him to wear a brace, and told Peek to move like Elvis so that the performance, which was also in playback, was more dynamic. The result was that Paul Peek totally monopolized the camera and made the scene mythical.

Paul Peek participated in the recording of such emblematic songs from Vincent’s repertoire as “Unchained Melody”, “Cat Man” and “B-I-Bickey Bi Bo Bo Go” 0 “Pink Thunderbird”, the latter composed by Peek. He also achieved a singular honour as a member of the band when, in the fall of 1956, Vincent ended up recording one of Peek’s songs. He also appeared with Vincent in another movie, Hot Rod Gang. Paul Peek was with the Blue Caps until Gene Vincent stopped accompanying them in the late 1950s.

Parallel to his years as a member of the Blue Caps, Peek developed a very interesting solo career, releasing more than 14 singles between the late 1950s and the 1960s.

Peek made it onto the charts with “Brother-in-Law”, a song in response to Ernie K-Doe’s “Mother-In-Law”. As a soloist, he recorded a wide range of styles, R’n’B with New Orleans, Rock & Roll, Northern Soul, Country, Rockabilly, High School style ballads, etc…. In addition to all the aforementioned Paul Peek was responsible for Esquerita getting a contract on Capitol Records, Peek discovered Esquerita while playing in a seedy club and was so impressed that he made him record some demos on a Greenville radio station (WESC) around 1958. At the time, Peek was a member of the Blue Caps, which had a contract with Capitol Records. From these contacts and the influence of Paul Peek with Capitol Records came a record contract for Esquerita. Peek even co-wrote the song “The Rock-Around” with Esquerita, who played the piano on the recording.

Paul Peek was the first artist to record for the NRC (National Recording Corporation) label, this label released the single “The Rock Around” in 1958.

Unfortunately, Peek never made it to the top, his alcohol problems took its toll and escalated over the years.

In the 1980s he joined Blue Caps for a tour of Europe, it was in those years that he met Jeff Beck. Peek and Beck became mutual admirers, Beck also recorded “Pink Thunderbird” on their Crazy Legs album.

Peek’s last years were difficult, his alcohol consumption had worsened and he had lost an eye in a car accident. His health began to worsen in the late 1990s and he died of liver cirrhosis in 2001.

Juanmy “The Hunter”

Feliz Cumpleaños Bill Kirchen (Commander Cody)

El 29 de junio fue el cumpleaños de William Knight “Bill” Kirchen, “El Titán de la Telecaster”.
Bill Kirchen fue uno de los miembros fundadores del Comandante Cody y su Planeta Airmem, con quien estuvo de 1967 a 1976. El Comandante Cody es una de las bandas pioneras de lo que se ha dado en llamar americano, en su espectro musical había espacio para el Country-Rock, Western Swing, Rockabilly, R’n’B, Boogie, Swing, Rock & Roll de los 50, etc.

Sus parámetros sonoros y musicales estaban muy alejados de la mayoría de los grupos de su generación. El grupo era muy conocido en el área de la bahía de San Francisco, donde tuvieron un gran éxito. Tras la ruptura con el comandante Cody, Kirchen comenzó una carrera en solitario muy exitosa.

A lo largo de su carrera Kirchen ha sido un músico muy solicitado por grandes figuras del Country, Rock & Roll, Blues y Pop colaborando con Nick Lowe, Elvis Costello, Gene Vincent, Link Wray, Danny Gatton, Roy Buchanan, Om Principato, Evan Johns, Billy Hancock, Linwood Taylor, Dave Chappell, Jimmy Thackery, The Nighthawks, entre otros. Kirchen ha creado su propio sonido, llamado “dieselbilly”, una mezcla de ingredientes de country, blues, rockabilly, swing occidental y boogie-woogie, con un tema de Trucker Music.

Más de 12 Lp’s en solitario y muchas colaboraciones, y una larga colección de premios muy prestigiosos dentro de la música de raíz americana, le corroboran como uno de los intérpretes más sólidos y reputados de la música americana. Desde aquí nos complace felicitarle por su cumpleaños y desearle muchos años de éxito.

Happy Birthday Bill Kirchen (Commander Cody)

June 29th was the birthday of William Knight “Bill” Kirchen, “The Titan of The Telecaster” .Bill Kirchen was one of the founding members of Commander Cody & His Planet Airmem, with whom he was from 1967 to 1976. Commander Cody is one of the pioneering bands of what has come to be known as American, in its musical spectrum there was room for Country-Rock, Western Swing, Rockabilly, R’n’B, Boogie, Swing, 50’s Rock & Roll, etc.

Their sound and musical parameters were far removed from the majority of groups of their generation. The group was well known in the San Francisco Bay Area, where they enjoyed great success. After the split with Commander Cody, Kirchen began a very successful solo career.

Throughout his career Kirchen has been a much sought after musician by great figures of Country, Rock & Roll, Blues and Pop collaborating with Nick Lowe, Elvis Costello, Gene Vincent, Link Wray, Danny Gatton, Roy Buchanan, Om Principato, Evan Johns, Billy Hancock, Linwood Taylor, Dave Chappell, Jimmy Thackery, The Nighthawks, among others. Kirchen has created his own sound, called “dieselbilly”, a mix of country, blues, rockabilly, western swing and boogie-woogie ingredients, with a Trucker Music theme.

More than 12 Lp’s in solo and lots of collaborations, and a long collection of very prestigious awards within the American roots music, corroborate him as one of the most solid and reputable performers of American music. From here we are happy to congratulate you on your birthday and wish you many years of success.

The Easybeats Live in Beat Club 1966

Los Easybeats y su éxito “Friday on My Mind”, son los abanderados del Beat y del Pop Australiano de los 60. Conocidos como los Australian Beatles, el grupo también es considerado por muchos como un precursor del Powerpop.

Los Easybeats se formaron en Sydney a principios de los años 60, y originalmente se llamaban “Starfighters”. Fueron formados por George Young (guitarra rítmica y piano), Harry Vanda (guitarra principal), Dick Diamonte (bajo), Gordon “Snowy” Fleet (batería), Stevie Wright (voz).

Ninguno de los miembros del grupo era en realidad australiano, George era de Escocia, Harry y Dick eran de los Países Bajos, Stevie y Gordon eran ingleses, Gordon era de Liverpool y había formado parte de The Mojos, una gran banda de Merseybeat que fue muy conocida entre 1963-64, él fue el que inventó el nombre del grupo y el que tenía la idea más clara del camino a seguir por la banda y el sonido que tenían que tener para triunfar.

En 1964 el grupo fue contratado por Albert Productions, la división australiana del sello EMI Parlophone. En 1965 apareció su álbum debut, el magnífico lp “Easy”. A partir de este álbum se convirtieron en los reyes de los Beatles australianos y comenzaron a ser conocidos como los Beatles australianos. Este álbum, en particular, está fuertemente influenciado por The Hollies y no tanto por The Beatles. Entre 1965 y 1966 lanzaron más de media docena de singles, y los lp’s “It’s 2 Easy” y “Volume 3”, todos con gran éxito.el grupo logró tener 8 temas en el Top Ten de singles, en sólo un año y medio.

El clímax de su meteórica carrera llegó en 1966, con la oportunidad de grabar en Londres. Producido por Shel Talmy, grabaron el monumental “Friday On My Mind”

Esta canción, de Vanda y Young sería un éxito rotundo llegando al número 1 en Australia, 6 en el Reino Unido y 16 en los Estados Unidos. Top 10 en Alemania, Holanda, Francia e Italia, y vendió más de un millón de copias en todo el mundo. Este fue su único éxito en los Estados Unidos.

La banda estuvo activa hasta 1969. Young hermano mayor de Malcolm y Angus (AC/DC), junto con Vanda centraron su carrera en la producción musical, son responsables de la producción de todos los álbumes de AC/DC entre 1974 y 1978.

The Easybeats Live in Beat Club 1966

The Easybeats and their hit “Friday on My Mind”, are the standard bearers of Beat and Australian Pop of the 60’s. Known as the Australian Beatles, the group is also considered by many to be a precursor to Powerpop.

The Easybeats were formed in Sydney in the early 1960s, and were originally called “Starfighters”. They were formed by George Young (Rhythmic Guitar and Piano), Harry Vanda (Lead Guitar), Dick Diamonte (Bass), Gordon “Snowy” Fleet (Drums), Stevie Wright (Voice).

None of the members of the group were actually Australian, George was from Scotland, Harry and Dick were from the Netherlands, Stevie and Gordon were English, Gordon was from Liverpool and had been part of The Mojos, a great Merseybeat band that was very well known between 1963-64, he was the one who invented the name of the group and the one who had the clearest idea of the path to follow for the band and the sound they had to have to succeed.

In 1964 the group was hired by Albert Productions, the Australian division of the EMI Parlophone label. In 1965 their debut album appeared, the magnificent lp “Easy”. From this album they became the kings of the Australian Beatles and began to be known as the Australian Beatles. This album, in particular, is strongly influenced by The Hollies and not so much by The Beatles. Between 1965 and 1966 they released more than half a dozen singles, and the lp’s “It’s 2 Easy” and “Volume 3”, all with great success.the group managed to have 8 tracks in the Top Ten of singles, in just a year and a half.

The climax of their meteoric career came in 1966, with the opportunity to record in London. Produced by Shel Talmy, they recorded the monumental “Friday On My Mind”

This song, by Vanda and Young would be a resounding success reaching number 1 in Australia, 6 in the UK and 16 in the USA. Top 10 in Germany, the Netherlands, France and Italy, and sold over a million copies worldwide. This was his only success in the USA.

The band was active until 1969. Young, older brother of Malcolm and Angus (AC/DC), together with Vanda focused their career on music production, they are responsible for the production of all AC/DC albums between 1974 and 1978.

Beat Club Blues Special 1970 Muddy Waters

Hoy en Poison Ivy Lovers, queremos ofrecerles el video de uno de los mejores programas de música de todos los tiempos, su nombre era Beat-Club.
Beat-Club era un programa de música alemán que se emitió de 1965 a 1972.

Muchos artistas como The Doors, The Beach Boys, Frank Zappa, Ike & Tina Turner o los Rolling Stones tocaron en este programa.

Pero esta vez queremos centrarnos en el especial de blues que hicieron en 1970. Un documento único que les recomendamos encarecidamente.

En este programa verán las increíbles actuaciones de ‘Champion Jack Dupree, Sonny Terry & Brownie McGee y Muddy Waters.

Traducción realizada con la versión gratuita del traductor www.DeepL.com/Translator